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Category Archives: Holiday Celebration

  • On the Eve of the Memorial Day weekend and the unofficial start of Summer, we at Cremation Society of America would like to take a moment to express our thanks to all who made the ultimate sacrifice to defend our magnificent nation, the United States of America. As we spend time with family and friends during this uniquely American holiday, let’s keep in mind how Memorial Day came to be.

    Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. Memorial Day 2021 will occur on Monday, May 31.

    Originally known as Decoration Day, it originated in the years following the Civil War and became an official federal holiday in 1971. Many Americans observe Memorial Day by visiting cemeteries or memorials, holding family gatherings and participating in parades. Unofficially, it marks the beginning of the summer season.

    Origins of Memorial Day

    The Civil War, which ended in the spring of 1865, claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history and required the establishment of the country’s first national cemeteries.

    By the late 1860s, Americans in various towns and cities had begun holding springtime tributes to these countless fallen soldiers, decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers.

    Did you know? Each year on Memorial Day a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time.

    It is unclear where exactly this tradition originated; numerous different communities may have independently initiated the memorial gatherings. And some records show that one of the earliest Memorial Day commemorations was organized by a group of formerly enslaved people in Charleston, South Carolina less than a month after the Confederacy surrendered in 1865. Nevertheless, in 1966 the federal government declared Waterloo, New York, the official birthplace of Memorial Day.

    Waterloo—which first celebrated the day on May 5, 1866—was chosen because it hosted an annual, community-wide event, during which businesses closed and residents decorated the graves of soldiers with flowers and flags.On May 5, 1868, General John A. Logan, leader of an organization for Northern Civil War veterans, called for a nationwide day of remembrance later that month. “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land,” he proclaimed.

    The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn’t the anniversary of any particular battle.

    On the first Decoration Day, General James Garfield made a speech at Arlington National Cemetery, and 5,000 participants decorated the graves of the 20,000 Civil War soldiers buried there.

    Many Northern states held similar commemorative events and reprised the tradition in subsequent years; by 1890 each one had made Decoration Day an official state holiday. Southern states, on the other hand, continued to honor the dead on separate days until after World War I.

    The Modern Memorial Day

    Memorial Day, as Decoration Day gradually came to be known, originally honored only those lost while fighting in the Civil War. But during World War I the United States found itself embroiled in another major conflict, and the holiday evolved to commemorate American military personnel who died in all wars, including World War II, The Vietnam War, The Korean War and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    For decades, Memorial Day continued to be observed on May 30, the date General Logan had selected for the first Decoration Day. But in 1968, Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees. The change went into effect in 1971. The same law also declared Memorial Day a federal holiday.

    Did You Know?

    In the spring of 1915, bright red flowers began poking through the battle-ravaged land across northern France and Flanders (northern Belgium). Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, who served as a brigade surgeon for an Allied artillery unit, spotted a cluster of the poppies shortly after serving as a brigade surgeon during the bloody Second Battle of Ypres. The sight of the bright red flowers against the dreary backdrop of war inspired McCrae to pen the poem, “In Flanders Field,” in which he gives voice to the soldiers who had been killed in battle and lay buried beneath the poppy-covered grounds. Later that year, a Georgia teacher and volunteer war worker named Moina Michael read the poem in Ladies’ Home Journal and wrote her own poem, “We Shall Keep the Faith” to begin a campaign to make the poppy a symbol of tribute to all who died in war. The poppy remains a symbol of remembrance to this day.

    We wish you and your family and friends a Happy and Solemn Memorial Day. Never forget.

    Please Contact CSA for more information regarding our Direct Cremation services. CSA can also help you Pre-Plan all of your Direct Cremation services to meet your needs. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

Category Archives: Holiday Celebration

  • There’s is no sugar-coating the fact that 2020 was a challenging year for all of us. The New Year of 2021 brings the promise of a fresh start and a return to normalcy and togetherness.

    Throughout 2020, we at Cremation Society of America were ready and willing to meet all of our customers’ cremation needs. We take great pride in the fact that we can offer to you the industry’s most affordable, secure and convenient Direct Cremation service.

    Despite the difficulties of lockdowns and travel restrictions, we at CSA were able to expand our service area to the West Coast of Florida all the way up the coast from Naples to Tampa, and beyond. In the New Year, we will continue to expand our services to include additional portions of the State of Florida – and beyond.

    Our secure and intuitive Online Ordering System can be completed in just a few minutes and is easy to understand. Here are a few highlights of our Cremation Online Ordering System:

    • Choose either Direct Cremation for a loved one who has passed or Pre-Plan for a Cremation in the future
    • Enter your contact information
    • Choose from one of Three Packages
    • Select Medical Examiner Cremation Approval Fee, if applicable
    • Select Delivery Method
    • Order Death Certificate(s)
    • Choose from a selection of Cremation Jewelry and Celebration of Life Kit options, if desired
    • Enter Billing and Shipping Addresses
    • Enter payment information
    • Complete the Necessary Forms
    • You simply SUBMIT and you’re all set! The entire process takes just a few minutes and we’ll take care of the rest

    Cremation Society of America (“CSA”) is your trusted provider of Cremation services. Since we at CSA focus solely on Cremation – and leave funerals, burials and ceremonies to others – we can offer cost-effective Cremation services without sacrificing the dignity or solemnity of your love one.

    We understand that there is rarely a convenient time to arrange for a Direct Cremation. However, we are confident that you will find our streamlined Cremation Online Ordering System easy to use and it will take little time to complete. Don’t forget that all Online Direct Cremation orders come with a 30-Day 100% Money Back Guarantee!

    We’re here for you in the New Year to meet all of your Direct Cremation needs. Please give us a call to speak with one of our certified Cremation Specialists.

    May the New Year bring you and your family and loves ones health, happiness and endless blessings.

Category Archives: Holiday Celebration

  • 2020 has been a challenging year for us all. However, we at Cremation Society of America are deeply thankful for all of YOU who chose us to serve your cremation needs during these trying and uncertain times.

    Throughout the coming week, family and friends will gather together on Thanksgiving, albeit under certain restrictions, to take stock of their blessings and to be thankful for so many things. We at Cremation Society of America would like to take a moment to express our thanks to YOU for the privilege to serve YOU. Without YOU, we would not be able to do what we love: provide respectful and dignified cremation services during a time of stress and sadness.

    Thanks to your continued support, we’ve been able to expand our service area to nearly all of the State of Florida! Click HERE to learn more!

    It may sound a bit cliché but we Americans are blessed by living in the greatest, most generous nation in the world. We should be thankful for all of the sacrifices of those who came before us so that we may be free. As we like to do this time of year, we’d like to give you a brief description of the origins of this truly American holiday:

    Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2019 occurs on Thursday, November 28. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

    The original feast in 1621 occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Unlike our modern holiday, it was three days long. The event was based on English harvest festivals, which traditionally occurred around the 29th of September. After that first harvest was completed by the Plymouth colonists, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer, shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. In 1623 a day of fasting and prayer during a period of drought was changed to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during the prayers. Gradually the custom prevailed in New England of annually celebrating thanksgiving after the harvest.

    During the American Revolution a yearly day of national thanksgiving was suggested by the Continental Congress. In 1817 New York State adopted Thanksgiving Day as an annual custom, and by the middle of the 19th century many other states had done the same.

    In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln appointed a day of thanksgiving as the last Thursday in November, which he may have correlated it with the November 21, 1621, anchoring of the Mayflower at Cape Cod. Since then, each president has issued a Thanksgiving Day proclamation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt set the date for Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November in 1939 (approved by Congress in 1941.)

    We at Cremation Society of America would like to wish you and your family a safe and Happy Thanksgiving. We hope that you cherish these moments surrounded by family and friends in the spirit of joy and Thanksgiving. We look forward to a time in the very near future where we can once again gather without concern over the Pandemic.

Category Archives: Holiday Celebration

  • We at Cremation Society of America are reminded during this holiday season of how thankful we should be for all of YOU!

    Throughout this week, family and friends will gather together on Thanksgiving to take stock of their blessings and to be thankful for so many things. We at Cremation Society of America would like to take a moment to express our thanks to YOU for the privilege to serve YOU. Without YOU, we would not be able to do what we love: provide respectful and dignified cremation services during a time of stress and sadness.

    It may sound a bit cliché but we Americans are blessed by living in the greatest, most generous nation in the world. We should be thankful for all of the sacrifices of those who came before us so that we may be free. In case you were wondering how the Thanksgiving Holiday came to be, here is a brief history:

    Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2019 occurs on Thursday, November 28. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

    The original feast in 1621 occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Unlike our modern holiday, it was three days long. The event was based on English harvest festivals, which traditionally occurred around the 29th of September. After that first harvest was completed by the Plymouth colonists, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer, shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. In 1623 a day of fasting and prayer during a period of drought was changed to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during the prayers. Gradually the custom prevailed in New England of annually celebrating thanksgiving after the harvest.

    During the American Revolution a yearly day of national thanksgiving was suggested by the Continental Congress. In 1817 New York State adopted Thanksgiving Day as an annual custom, and by the middle of the 19th century many other states had done the same.

    In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln appointed a day of thanksgiving as the last Thursday in November, which he may have correlated it with the November 21, 1621, anchoring of the Mayflower at Cape Cod. Since then, each president has issued a Thanksgiving Day proclamation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt set the date for Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November in 1939 (approved by Congress in 1941.)

    We at Cremation Society of America would like to wish you and your family a safe and Happy Thanksgiving. We hope that you cherish these moments surrounded by family and friends in the spirit of joy and Thanksgiving.

Category Archives: Holiday Celebration

  • During the next several weeks, family and friends will gather together on Christmas and New Years to celebrate the joy and blessings of the past year as well as the hope and promise of 2019.

    The entire Cremation Society of America Family would like to take this moment to wish you and your family a most Blessed and Merry Christmas as well as Health and Happiness in 2019! We thank YOU and all of our clients for the privilege to serve YOU throughout 2018. Without YOU, we would not be able to do what we love: Providing dignified services to your family at a time of stress and concern. Remember this as we enter 2019: When you need us, we’ll be there for YOU.

    As everyone around you makes their New Years’ resolutions, we at Cremation Society of America resolve to continue to provide you with the BEST cremation-related services delivered by the BEST people at the BEST possible price with dignity and respect.

    Keep in mind that as you look for meaningful and practical gifts for those around you, especially family, the gift of a Pre-Planned Direct Cremation is a deeply heart-felt gesture to ease the unforeseen burden for a loved one. A custom urn may also be a welcome gift. 

    You have our promise to continue in 2019 our mission to lift the cloud of confusion that often surrounds cremation services and to be ready to assist you and your loved ones through this process with a gentle, guiding presence. 

    From our Cremation Society of America Family to yours, please enjoy a merry, safe and blessed Christmas! And may your New Year be filled with health, happiness and joy!

Category Archives: Holiday Celebration

  • Throughout this week, family and friends will gather together on Thanksgiving to take stock of their blessings and to be thankful for so many things. We at Cremation Society of America would like to take a moment to express our thanks to YOU for the privilege to serve YOU. Without YOU, we would not be able to do what we love: provide respectful and dignified cremation services during a time of stress and sadness.

    It may sound a bit cliché but we Americans are blessed by living in the greatest, most generous nation in the world. We should be thankful for all of the sacrifices of those who came before us so that we may be free. In case you were wondering how the Thanksgiving Holiday came to be, here is a brief history:

    Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2018 occurs on Thursday, November 22. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

    The original feast in 1621 occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Unlike our modern holiday, it was three days long. The event was based on English harvest festivals, which traditionally occurred around the 29th of September. After that first harvest was completed by the Plymouth colonists, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer, shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. In 1623 a day of fasting and prayer during a period of drought was changed to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during the prayers. Gradually the custom prevailed in New England of annually celebrating thanksgiving after the harvest.

    During the American Revolution a yearly day of national thanksgiving was suggested by the Continental Congress. In 1817 New York State adopted Thanksgiving Day as an annual custom, and by the middle of the 19th century many other states had done the same.

    In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln appointed a day of thanksgiving as the last Thursday in November, which he may have correlated it with the November 21, 1621, anchoring of the Mayflower at Cape Cod. Since then, each president has issued a Thanksgiving Day proclamation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt set the date for Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November in 1939 (approved by Congress in 1941.)

    We at Cremation Society of America would like to wish you and your family a safe and Happy Thanksgiving. We hope that you cherish these moments surrounded by family and friends in the spirit of joy and Thanksgiving.