Category Archives: Cremation

  • Throughout this week, family and friends will gather together on Thanksgiving to take stock of their blessings and to be thankful for so many things. We at Cremation Society of America would like to take a moment to express our thanks to YOU for the privilege to serve YOU. Without YOU, we would not be able to do what we love: provide respectful and dignified cremation services during a time of stress and sadness.

    It may sound a bit cliché but we Americans are blessed by living in the greatest, most generous nation in the world. We should be thankful for all of the sacrifices of those who came before us so that we may be free. In case you were wondering how the Thanksgiving Holiday came to be, here is a brief history:

    Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday in the United States, and Thanksgiving 2018 occurs on Thursday, November 22. In 1621, the Plymouth colonists and Wampanoag Indians shared an autumn harvest feast that is acknowledged today as one of the first Thanksgiving celebrations in the colonies. For more than two centuries, days of thanksgiving were celebrated by individual colonies and states.

    The original feast in 1621 occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Unlike our modern holiday, it was three days long. The event was based on English harvest festivals, which traditionally occurred around the 29th of September. After that first harvest was completed by the Plymouth colonists, Gov. William Bradford proclaimed a day of thanksgiving and prayer, shared by all the colonists and neighboring Indians. In 1623 a day of fasting and prayer during a period of drought was changed to one of thanksgiving because the rain came during the prayers. Gradually the custom prevailed in New England of annually celebrating thanksgiving after the harvest.

    During the American Revolution a yearly day of national thanksgiving was suggested by the Continental Congress. In 1817 New York State adopted Thanksgiving Day as an annual custom, and by the middle of the 19th century many other states had done the same.

    In 1863 President Abraham Lincoln appointed a day of thanksgiving as the last Thursday in November, which he may have correlated it with the November 21, 1621, anchoring of the Mayflower at Cape Cod. Since then, each president has issued a Thanksgiving Day proclamation. President Franklin D. Roosevelt set the date for Thanksgiving to the fourth Thursday of November in 1939 (approved by Congress in 1941.)

    We at Cremation Society of America would like to wish you and your family a safe and Happy Thanksgiving. We hope that you cherish these moments surrounded by family and friends in the spirit of joy and Thanksgiving.

Category Archives: Cremation

  • Loss of loved one can indeed be a very disappointing affair. In fact, sometimes, we just can’t get rid of such thoughts and it is burdening to move on. However, you need to accept the fact and tackle this situation in the best way.

    You need to select the right kind of cremation package; this is necessary because they will carry out all the tasks in a professional manner. Your loved one deserves to receive the best treatment for sure.

    Search for a very good cremation service provider as all the responsibilities will be taken care of by him. Shortlisting the best company is necessary as professionalism is displayed at each and every step.

    These cremation services are highly affordable and are pretty economical; when you choose a complete package, it proves to be more affordable than the one you are going to manage. For example, you will have to take care of all the burial responsibilities. However, when a professional is hired, things are going to be easier. They will handle heavy works too & you won’t have that burden of managing everything during this grief period.

    1. Finding the right cremation package is easy. Only thing is you need a very good company to do so. The Internet is your best friend while doing so. You can easily access a variety of websites. Whenever you browse, you will get professional services nearby. All you have to do is figure out which the best one is.

    2. Select an affordable package. Don’t extend your budget always. Keep your budgets ready and plan accordingly. Right from the start, you need to stick to the plan. Compare the prices and book a package in line with that. Sometimes, you will get the best plan while at other times, you will have to bargain. Good discounts will be given in the final pricing, however, it’s necessary for you to know the kind of services you are looking for.

    3. Not only cremation, but even other things will be taken care of. For instance, duties after cremation, duties before that and other extra elements. Rather than organizing everything on your own, it’s good to do things professionally.

    4. Check what all is included in the package. Always select the package that includes everything together. This is indeed a great way to get good value. You can access things conveniently and decide on the best one. Preferably, select the one that also offers medical reports. This is indeed very vital while selecting the package.

    Whenever you are out finalizing the right package, you have to take several factors into consideration. Of course, your loved one should get only good things from you after he has left the world. There should be no stone left unturned during the funeral. With the right tips and tricks, you will surely be able to find a good provider. Don’t hurry for everything. Be calm and composed and accordingly plan things. A professional will serve you in the best way.

Category Archives: Cremation

  • Now that the Fall is upon us, our attention soon turns to the upcoming Holidays and planning our travel to visit family and friends.

    What if a Loved One passes away while traveling to visit family? As we described in our Blog, “Direct Cremation”, sometimes called “Simple Cremation” or “Immediate Cremation” is when the cremation is performed soon after death, without a viewing, visitation or funeral service of any kind.

    What if you’ve arranged for your Direct Cremation and you’re planning a trip across the United States to visit family for Thanksgiving or another holiday? What happens if you or a loved one passes away unexpectedly in another state that is thousands of miles away from home? How do you ensure that your loved one is returned home in a dignified manner? How much will such arrangements cost?

    You’ll have to deal with the rules and regulations of the airlines when it comes to the transportation of your loved one’s remains – and the cost as well. You’ll also have to arrange for the remains to be transported to your pre-planned facility for cremation. And you’ll need to manage these issues during a time of sudden and likely overwhelming grief.

    A Travel Protection Plan can save time, stress, and cost for you or your next-of-kin should your death occur while traveling away from your legal residence. Most Travel Protection Plans will include many of the following services:

    • Prepare remains for transport, regardless of where the remains are located worldwide
    • Locate funeral home or direct disposition (cremation) facility
    • Arrange for transportation of remains from place of death to funeral home or direct disposition (cremation) facility
    • Purchase casket/air tray to meet transportation requirements, including international transportation
    • Arrange and pay for transport to city of legal residence
    • Secure and process all documentation required for remains transportation, including death certificate

    Most Travel Protection Plans are triggered when the death occurs a certain number of miles away from the person’s legal residence. Be sure to review your Travel Protection Plan carefully for specific terms and conditions.

    At a time of shock and grief, you or your loved ones would make just one phone call to activate the Plan. Once activated, the Plan agents immediately commence arrangements to provide you and your loved ones with peace of mind amidst the chaos of returning home from your journey.

    Please contact CSA for more information regarding Travel Protection Plans and how such a plan can factor into your Pre-Panning strategy. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

     

Category Archives: Cremation

  • So long as you use a licensed and reputable crematory or Cremation Service, you can assume that the ashes or cremains placed in your urn are indeed your loved one. However, many of us have asked ourselves the question “Is he or she REALLY in there? How would I really know? Did the crematory make a mistake?”

    At Cremation Society of America, you receive our Cremation Integrity Promise that our specially-trained team strictly follows our established protocols for ensuring that your loved one is positively identified throughout the cremation process.

    Our industry-leading chain-of-custody procedures include the following:

    Step 1: Before your loved one is removed from the place of death, a sealed identification band is placed on your loved one’s ankle. The placement of the band is certified and witnessed. Your loved one is then transported to our location in a solemn and dignified fashion.

    Step 2: Upon arrival at our location, the information on the identification band is confirmed a second time to be true and correct. A second identification band is then created with a barcode and placed on the wrist of your loved one. The barcode is then scanned and your loved one’s identification is entered into our system for validation and tracking. This ensures that we know the name of your loved one and your loved one’s precise location anywhere within our facility.

    Step 3: Once the designated family members make positive identification of your loved one by viewing or providing a photo ID, your loved one is then moved to the crematory.

    Step 4: Upon arriving at the crematory, identification and verification is confirmed once again and witnessed. Your loved one is then placed in the cremation chamber. An indestructible identification disk is placed in the chamber with your loved one. The disk is approximately the size of a quarter and is made of stainless steel. It will not melt despite the intense heat of the chamber. Unique identification numbers are stamped onto the disk for future verification. The disk will remain with the ashes (cremains) and we will keep a record of the unique identification numbers indefinitely. You are welcome to review the identification numbers upon request.

    Step 5: Once the cremation process is complete, the cremains – including the disk – are then placed into the container or urn selected by the family. The disk remains in the run with the cremains to provide an ironclad method of ensuring that your loved one’s ashes are indeed inside the urn.

    Please contact CSA for more information regarding our Direct Cremation services and our industry-leading identification protocols to provide you with peace of mind. CSA can also help you pre-plan all of your Direct Cremation services to meet your needs. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

Category Archives: Cremation

  • After a loved one has been cremated, there are many ways to treat the cremains: For example, you can place the cremains in an urn and display in your home or office. You can also choose to scatter your loved one’s ashes in the sea or in a location that was meaningful to your loved one. Another way to treat the cremains is gaining in popularity: Cremation Jewelry.

    Cremation Jewelry (which is also known as Funeral Jewelry, Remembrance Jewelry or Memorial Jewelry) is simply a way for people to be close to a loved one in lieu of other cremation options. Cremation Jewelry can be created in a nearly infinite choice of designs, styles and shapes with a nearly infinite price range as well. Cremation Jewelry can be very simple and understated, ornate and extravagant and everything in between.

    Most Cremation Jewelry is designed as a vessel to contain a portion of a loved one’s cremains and can appear as a locket or keepsake. For those who don’t wish to place cremains in the jewelry, they can use jewelry (pendants, etc.) as vessels to preserve memorial materials such as sand from a favorite beach, soil from a garden, a lock of hair, or even a special photograph.

    Here are some examples of Cremation Jewelry:

    • Miniature Urn Necklaces: The most popular form of Cremation Jewelry is a very small urn attached to a chain worn around the neck. The urn is light and contains a small portion of cremains. This small portion enables multiple family members to share in the cremains with their own Urn Necklace. Common urn shapes include simple cylinders and hearts to more ornate designs with religious symbols or even animals or fish. You can choose a shape or design that or a more basic design that matches most ensembles.
    • Cremains into Glass Pendants: Skilled artisan glassblowers have been working cremains directly into beautiful designs for statues, paperweights and more. Glass Cremains Pendants are similar in layout, using a mixture of colored glass and a small portion of cremains to craft unique and meaningful jewelry.
    • Cremains into Diamonds: Cremains can even be formed into a man-made diamond that can be worn in a necklace, in earrings, or on a ring. During the cremation process of the diamond, the loved one’s cremains are incorporated into the carbon, making it impossible to tell the difference between a diamond containing cremains and a diamond without cremains. It’s can be a unique keepsake that only you and your loved ones will know about. Diamonds containing cremains can range in cost from $3,000 to $10,000.

    Please contact CSA for more information regarding our selection of Cremation Jewelry. We can also refer you to craftsmen who can imbue cremains into glass pendants or even diamonds. CSA can also help you pre-plan all of your Direct Cremation services to meet your needs. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

     

Category Archives: Cremation

  • As with all Cremation pre-planning, the time to choose an Urn for your loved one is well in advance. With the myriad of decisions that will bombard you and your family in the days following the passing of a loved one, Pre-Planning can bring a certain bit of peace to all involved. When it comes to selecting an Urn, the choices seem to be overwhelming. Where do you even start? At Cremation Society of America, we’re here to help.

    Urns come in a bewildering array of shapes, sizes, designs and materials. You can refine your search by focusing on the following questions:

    • Do I even need an Urn?
    • How will I use the Urn?
    • How much can I pay for an Urn?
    • Of which material should the Urn be made?
    • How should the Urn be designed and decorated?

    Let’s take a look at each of the questions.

    Do I even need an Urn?

    When choosing to pre-plan for a Direct Cremation, there are many ways to honor and memorialize your loved one. Deciding how to remember your loved one will affect all other urn decisions, such as:

    • Scattering Ashes at Sea: This is an increasingly popular option. You can choose an Urn with a removable lid or even use an approved biodegradable or alternative container
    • Land Burial: Another instance where an approved biodegradable or alternative container can be used
    • Urn for Display: This is the more traditional option for cremains. These Urns are made out of metal, marble, ceramic, stone or glass and are more permanent in nature
    • Urns residing in a columbarium: Much like Urns for Display, these are made out of metal, marble, ceramic, stone or glass and are more permanent in nature. The size of the chamber or niche will dictate the scope and cost of the Urn
    • Jewelry or Keepsake Urns: These can be quite ornate and store a small amount of cremains. These Urns are desirable when families wish to share the cremains

    How much can I pay for an Urn?

    Cremation Urns come in a nearly infinite price range, so the first step is to know what you’d like to spend. There are many high-quality urns in the $135 – $295 range. Competitive Internet pricing of Urns has made them very affordable without your having to sacrifice the quality or the ornate beauty of the vessel.

    With a moderate budget you can select an Urn with higher production value and more expensive materials. Some marble urns, ceramic urns, glass urns, Cloisonné urns, and hand-crafted wood urns can be purchased for $250 – $500.

    For high or even unlimited budgets, you can order a custom-made Urn that can be called a work of art, such as Artisan Urns that are made by hand. These Urns are literally a one-of-a-kind expression of love and honor for your loved one. Such Urns can cost from $900 to tens of thousands of dollars and are often made from glass, wood, ceramic or rare, expensive metals.

    Of which material should the Urn be made?

    Whether you have chosen to scatter the cremains, place the urn in a columbarium, or display in your home or office, here are some things to keep in mind:

    • Biodegradable Urns – Ideal for burial because they are made from non-toxic, eco-friendly materials that decompose over time, releasing the cremains into the ground or water as materials break down.
    • Permanent Cremation Urns – Used for display or for internment, placed in a columbarium or entombing in a mausoleum. These are usually made of marble or granite, or metals such as aluminum, stainless steel or bronze, even high-quality wood.
    • Urns for Scattering Cremains – Designed and crafted to be lightweight, these Urns are ideal for performing a scattering ceremony on the water. These are usually made with biodegradable and water-soluble materials like paper or silk for releasing the cremains into the sea or other body of water.

    How should the Urn be designed and decorated?

    The possibilities are nearly infinite. Many families design the Urn to reflect their loved one’s personality, passions, hobbies or special interests to spark memories and stories so that the loved one lives forever. Some themes can include religious, patriotic, sports team or university, hobby motifs such as gardening, cars or music. Engraving is a preferred option for those who wish to personalize the cremation Urn to commemorate the loved one. Names, dates, or even quotes can be inscribed onto many urns.

    Please contact CSA for more information regarding our selection of Urns and which Urn may best fit your Direct Cremation needs. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

Category Archives: Cremation

  • As more and more families choose Cremation as their funeral choice, Cremation Scams and Fraudulent Practices are also on the rise. As with IRS scams and Banking scams, Cremation Scams are aimed at people 65 and older.  Fraudsters and scammers attempt to take advantage of the sadness, grief and confusion many feel in the aftermath of the loss of a loved one. This is a time of great vulnerability for families, especially those who did not take advantage of Pre-Planning Services.

    The best way to combat Cremation Scams and Fraud is education. Here are some examples of Cremation Scams:

    • Concealing or misrepresenting prices. Dishonest providers may deliberately avoid providing prices to you in writing or they even increase prices/fees once the cremains are delivered.
    • Selling extra or unnecessary services or items. Service providers may try to sell unnecessary additional services, such as embalming or a burial casket, as part of a cremation package. These items can be quite expensive and are considered “pure profit” by unscrupulous funeral providers. Oftentimes, providers will use “high-pressure” sales tactics to coerce elderly customers into buying unnecessary products and services.
    • Forcing consumers to buy proprietary goods. Sometimes called “cramming,” a family member who wants to use a family heirloom for the cremains may be coerced into buying an “approved” urn or casket that is only sold by the provider, at a premium of course.
    • Misrepresenting legal requirements for funeral or cremation services. Unscrupulous providers may insist that embalming is required by law, even in a direct cremation with no viewing or funeral service, despite the fact that embalming is not a statutory requirement in most states.

    Now that you know what a Cremation Scam looks like, here are some steps you can take to avoid falling victim to such scams:

    Don’t Be Afraid to Ask Questions. Cremation providers should be willing to answer any questions that you or your family may have. If a provider fails to answer questions, is evasive or tries to hurry your family into a decision that does not feel right, you could be at risk for a scam. Be sure to meet with family members and even a family attorney to organize your questions in advance. Such questions can include:

    • How can I be sure that my loved one’s cremains are actually his or hers?
    • How will the cremains be presented to the family?
    • How long will the cremation process take and how long will cremains be held prior to pick-up?
    • Do you offer support services for bereaved families, especially young children?

    Research the Cremation Provider. As more and more families opt for Cremation in lieu of burial, “fly by night” cremation-only providers have begun to appear. In the same way that you would investigate a general contractor before building a house or hiring an attorney to draft a will for your family, you should investigate the credentials and performance of your Cremation provider. Here are some ways to conduct your investigation:

    • Visit the provider’s website and locate the provider’s physical address
    • Most provider websites include an “About Us” section. In many cases, you can double-check that information with public resources, including the Better Business Bureau and certain state-specific licensing agencies
    • Be wary of offers that may be too good to be true. Contact at least two providers so that you can compare products and services. The more offers you compare, the better
    • Read online reviews on social media and other online resources such as Yelp and Google
    • Where possible, follow-up with references

    Arrange for a Witness be present at the Cremation. Request that a family member or representative (such as an attorney) witness the cremation to ensure that no mishandling or mistakes in identification happen at any point during the cremation process. The family representative must be able to visually identify the individual being cremated as a safeguard to ensure to that your loved one’s cremains are being returned to the family. Keep in mind that some states do not allow witnesses and some crematories have specific rules and regulations concerning witnesses, including additional fees to allow for a witness.

    Get Everything in Writing. Do not commit to any cremation services until you have received all documentation in writing and have had a chance to review, including having legal counsel review the documents.

    Know Your Rights. As a consumer, your rights are clear under the FTC’s Funeral Rule, which describes in detail how providers of funeral services should provide burial and cremation services. Knowing your rights can help you to avoid the cremation and funeral scams listed above.

    The FTC’s Funeral Rule applies to all types of funeral and cremation service providers except third-party sellers like casket and urn dealers or cemeteries without an on-site funeral home. Your rights when purchasing or contracting services for burial or cremation include:

    • The right to buy only the services and products you want.
    • The right to refuse embalming. Many state laws do not require embalming as the only preservation process. In some cases, refrigeration may suffice. Check with your specific state laws before being forced to pay for embalming.
    • The right to get price information by phone without agreeing to buy.Funeral service providers are required by law to give you the prices you request by phone without requiring you to provide your name or other information. You also have the right to compare prices without being obligated to purchase a provider’s services.
    • The right to a written, itemized price list and written statement that lists your products and services.
    • The right to use a container other than a casket for cremation.A provider might try to coerce you into purchasing a casket for cremation even though no laws require it. The provider must offer alternatives such as wooden boxes or cardboard.
    • Know your rights and Cremation requirements in your state.

    Pre-Planning. Not only can Pre-Planning save your family money, it is always better to make such important decisions ahead of time so that all aspects can be researched and evaluated. Rarely are proper decisions made under duress or during a time of grief and confusion.

    What actions can you take if you experience cremation fraud or fall victim to a cremation scam? Your rights under the FTC’s Funeral Rule are protected by several agencies and organizations, and you can report any experiences of fraud or scams to these entities for further investigation. You can report a funeral or cremation scam to the FTC here. State Attorneys General also investigate consumer complaints pertaining to funeral services. You can contact the Attorney General’s Office in your state by searching online.

    Business organizations also track complaints about the funeral and cremation industry. The Better Business Bureau and Consumer Protection Agency pursues reports of scams/fraud, and so does the Consumer Protection Agency.

    Veterans Benefits for Cremation. The Department of Veterans Affairs provides certain burial benefits for veterans of U.S. military service that covers free interment in a National Cemetery and associated military honors, and those benefits can also be used for cremation services. Ask your cremation provider how they are equipped to accommodate veterans and their families.

    As you can see above, education is the best way to avoid falling victim to any cremation or funeral scams. At Cremation Society of America, we are committed to providing you and your family with the most competitive and dignified Cremation services available. Please don’t hesitate to contact us for more information.

Category Archives: Cremation

  • A Trying Time

    A loved one has passed away and you are the parent, guardian or family friend of a child who is grieving the loss of the same loved one, be it a sibling, parent, grandparent, or other person close to the child. You are faced with the daunting task of not only coming to terms with your grief but also with helping the bereaved child come to terms with such a life-changing event.

    In cases where your loved one is to be cremated (which is happening more and more in today’s society), you should take steps to explain what cremation to the child in your care. Here are some helpful steps when seeking to comfort a child and to help with the healing process:

    Understand Cremation

    Believe it or not, many adults have never been taught what happens during cremation. The process of Cremation includes:

    • Cremation takes place at a building called a crematory or crematorium.  Sometimes crematories are adjacent to funeral homes, but often they are stand-alone operations not affiliated with a specific funeral home. There are more than 1,000 crematories in the United States and Canada today
    • Within the Crematorium is a special stainless-steel vault called a cremation chamber, or retort.  The body is placed in a sturdy cardboard container and the container is moved into the cremation chamber. The body may also be cremated in a casket. After the container or casket is placed in the chamber, the chamber door is tightly sealed and the licensed operator turns on the heat
    • A gas jet creates an intense, white-hot heat in the back of the cremation chamber.  Because of the intensity of the heat, the body ignites and burns until only bone fragments remain. This process can take an estimated 2-4 hours
    • Upon completion of the cremation, the remains are collected in a metal tray.  At this point, the remains are small pieces of bone. To further reduce them, the remains are placed in a processor and refined down to the consistency of coarse sand
    • The white or grayish remains (called ashes, cremated remains or cremains) are then sealed in a transparent plastic bag along with an identification tag.  The bag weighs about 5 lbs. and is similar in size to a 5-lb. bag of sugar. Often the family requests that the cremated remains be placed in an urn, which can then be buried, placed in a columbarium (which is a special above-ground structure at a cemetery), taken home or transported for scattering.
     Encourage Questions from the Child

    Children are naturally curious about everything, including death but death is an uncomfortable subject for most adults because we all have suffered loss at some point in our lives. Such a discussion can unearth painful memories – and this is natural. However, you can be a resource for the child at a critical moment by being someone the child can turn to with death and cremation questions. Remember: Most young children assume that “grown-ups” have all of life’s answers. Encourage the child to ask you anything about the death and the funeral. Give the child honest answers – but in words and concepts that the child will understand.

    Use Simple Explanations

    Armed with your understanding of the cremation process, you need to plan which information to share with the child and how to share it. Take care to use words and concepts that the child can grasp and understand.  This depends not only on the age of the child but on the child’s personality, developmental level and vocabulary. If your words and your tone convey command of the information and familiarity with the cremation process, the child will likely feel the same way.

    Try to provide as much information as possible. Children have an amazing ability to cope with life-changing events. Don’t withhold facts in an attempt to spare a child what you consider to be disturbing details. Often, a child’s imagination can conjure up explanations much scarier than reality if the child is denied the facts. Be the compassionate adult who furthers the child’s understanding.

    Her are some child-friendly answers to questions often asked about cremation:

    • Cremation has been used for thousands of years.  The ancient Greeks and Romans built funeral pyres – stacks of wood with the loved one place atop. The wood was set afire and the body burned, too.  Funeral pyres are still used in some countries today as a tribute to the deceased
    • Cremation doesn’t hurt.  The person is dead, which means the body doesn’t work anymore.  The body’s heart doesn’t beat, the body doesn’t breathe, the brain has stopped working and it doesn’t feel anything anymore.
    • There is no smell and no smoke when a body is cremated.  The process is very, very hot—many times hotter than your oven at home or a campfire.  The heat burns away all the parts of the body except for some pieces of bone.
    • After cremation, what’s left of the body looks like kitty litter or beach sand, although it’s white in color because it’s bone.  It’s put in a clear plastic bag so you can see it if you want to.
    • When a body is buried in the ground in a grave, it breaks down after months and years and just a skeleton is left. Cremation is the same process except cremation makes this happen much faster.
    • The people involved in the cremation process handle the body with dignity and respect.

    Some final thoughts: Where possible, include the child in the cremation and services planning. Let the child feel part of the process of honoring your loved one. Much like many of us want to feel useful and needed during times of stress, so do children. Also, simply being available to the child in the days, weeks and months after the cremation will make for a path to healing. Whether sharing funny stories or expressing how much you both miss your loved one, simply being “someone to talk to” goes a long way to providing a healthy grieving process.

    Please contact CSA for more information regarding our Cremations services as well as family grieving resources. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

Category Archives: Cremation

  • What if a Loved One Passes Away Outside the United States? As we described in our Blog, “Direct Cremation”, sometimes called “Simple Cremation” or “Immediate Cremation” is when the cremation is performed soon after death, without a viewing, visitation or funeral service of any kind. Let’s say that you’ve arranged for your Direct Cremation and you’re planning a trip to Europe. What happens if you or a loved one passes away unexpectedly in a foreign country? How do you ensure that your loved one is returned home in a dignified manner? How much will such arrangements cost?

    As you might imagine, each country has its own laws and regulations pertaining to the preparation of a person’s remains before the remains can leave the country – not to mention the processing fees. Then, you’ll have to deal with the rules and regulations of the airlines when it comes to the transportation of your loved one’s remains – and the cost as well. Finally, you’ll have to arrange for the remains to be transported to your pre-planned facility for cremation.

    A Travel Protection Plan can save time, stress, and cost for you or your next-of-kin should your death occur while traveling away from your legal residence. Most Travel Protection Plans will include many of the following services:

    • Prepare remains for transport, regardless of where the remains are located worldwide
    • Locate funeral home or direct disposition (cremation) facility
    • Arrange for transportation of remains from place of death to funeral home or direct disposition (cremation) facility
    • Purchase casket/air tray to meet transportation requirements, including international transportation
    • Arrange and pay for transport to city of legal residence
    • Secure and process all documentation required for remains transportation, including death certificate

    Most Travel Protection Plans are triggered when the death occurs a certain number of miles away from the person’s legal residence. Be sure to review your Travel Protection Plan carefully for specific terms and conditions.

    At a time of shock and grief, you or your loved ones would make just one phone call to activate the Plan. Once activated, the Plan agents immediately commence arrangements to provide you and your loved ones with peace of mind amidst the chaos of returning home from your journey.

    Please contact CSA for more information regarding Travel Protection Plans and how such a plan can factor into your Pre-Panning strategy. We look forward to being of service to you and your family.

     

Category Archives: Cremation

  • Scattering ashes at sea has become more and more popular among families of the deceased.  This type of ceremony is considered by many to be much more natural and soothing for your loved ones versus traditional, terrestrial burials.

    Shortly following the cremation and receipt of the ashes, you are ready to provide your loved one with the ceremony and serenity that he or she deserves – and most likely requested with his or her final wishes.

    U.S. federal law allows for the scattering of ashes at sea but certain conditions must be met, including: the use of decomposable flowers and wreaths; certain notification requirements; ensuring that ashes are scattered at least three (3) nautical miles from shore; and others.

    To scatter your loved one’s cremated remains (“cremains”) by boat, family and friends board the vessel and travel to the desired location on the ocean. This typically involves chartering a boat with a licensed captain and the trip may last for several hours.

    Upon arrival at the desired location, the captain will position the vessel boat into the wind and with enough forward speed to prevent the cremains from being blown back into the vessel. The ceremony and tribute can begin. The ceremony can range from clergy reciting prayers to Family members reciting poetry to a few poignant comments and everything in between.

    Family members have the option to scatter the cremains if they so choose. The cremains are placed in the water and allowed to descend into the ocean. Cremation Society of America can help you to choose a reputable charter service to ensure that the cremains make it into the ocean properly.

    Shortly thereafter, the Family and friends are usually handed flowers or even a bouquet that they can toss in along with the cremains to create an area of the ceremony on the water. The captain can then circle the area while the Family and friends take photos and say their final goodbyes.

    With the Cremation Society of America Package One, our advisors can help you arrange to scatter your loved one’s ashes at sea. CSA has relationships with reputable charter services that have vast experience to provide a dignified and touching at-sea tribute to your loved one.

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